LED Blue, Green, Orange, Pink, Purble, Red, White and Yellow

Common resistor values for LEDs

The simplest method to limit the current into an LED is by using a resistor in series. For best results, the current limiting resistor value required for an LED is determined using the Ohm’s law, by using the LED’s Forward Current and Forward Voltage found on the manufacturer’s datasheet.

Sometimes you don’t have an easy way to determine the LED specifications -like when you grab a bag of those nice unlabeled LEDs of unknown manufacturer-, so I decided to bring together a table with the most common voltages, LED specifications and their current limiting resistor’s values:

LED color 3.3V 3.7V 5V 6V 9V 12V
AMBER
2.1V, 20mA
68 Ohm
1/8 W
82 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
220 Ohm
1/8 W
390 Ohm
1/4 W
560 Ohm
1/4 W
BLUE
3.2V, 20mA
5.6 Ohm
1/8 W
27 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
330 Ohm
1/8 W
470 Ohm
1/4 W
GREEN
2.1V, 20mA
68 Ohm
1/8 W
82 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
220 Ohm
1/8 W
390 Ohm
1/4 W
560 Ohm
1/4 W
ORANGE
2V, 20mA
68 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
180 Ohm
1/8 W
220 Ohm
1/8 W
390 Ohm
1/4 W
560 Ohm
1/4 W
PINK
3.2V, 20mA
5.6 Ohm
1/8 W
27 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
330 Ohm
1/8 W
470 Ohm
1/4 W
PURPLE
3.2V, 20mA
5.6 Ohm
1/8 W
27 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
330 Ohm
1/8 W
470 Ohm
1/4 W
RED
1.8V, 20mA
82 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
180 Ohm
1/8 W
220 Ohm
1/8 W
390 Ohm
1/4 W
560 Ohm
1/4 W
WHITE
3.2V, 20mA
5.6 Ohm
1/8 W
27 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
150 Ohm
1/8 W
330 Ohm
1/8 W
470 Ohm
1/4 W
YELLOW
2V, 20mA
68 Ohm
1/8 W
100 Ohm
1/8 W
180 Ohm
1/8 W
220 Ohm
1/8 W
390 Ohm
1/4 W
560 Ohm
1/4 W

Above resistor values are good for using with just one LED and are not recommended for more than one LED in series or parallel. Also, the table above is not suitable for High-Brightness LED which usually draw more current. As I’ve mentioned before, is always better to refer to the manufacturer’s datasheet for better results, so use with caution.

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